Lesson Plans

 

Home Preface of the Book Table of Contents Links to Authors About the Editors
Buy the Book
The Publisher
de Sitter Publications
Amazon.com
___________________
Other Helpful Links
Other Helpful
Parenting Links
(coming)
Who are CFLEs?
Other Edorsements
of the book
Gold Stars for Parents
Family Games
For Educators
Lesson Plans
Parenting Course
Locator (coming)


The following are lesson plans prepared by parent educators for previous occasions noted and could be used for a variety of settings, as indicated. They cover materials related to the following articles or chapters in Wisdom for Parents:


    Chap. 9, Natural and Logical Consequences, pp. 213ff
    Article, on “While Activities, p. 83f
    Managing Children’s Allowances, pertaining to article, Giving Allowances, pp. 22ff
    Nurturing Family Traditions (article on pp. 36ff in Wisdom for Parents)

***  ***  ***


Lesson Plans based on Keim, R.E., & Jacobson, A. L. (2011). Wisdom for Parents: Key Ideas from Parent Educators. Whitby, ON, Canada: de Sitter Publications.
Presented by Debbie Farr at TCFR Conference, March 2012


NATURAL AND LOGICAL CONSEQUENCES
CHAPTER 9, Wisdom for Parents, pp. 213ff

Topic/Concept: Using the theoretical approach of social order, e.g. the use of the family as a social
system with established rules, focus will be on natural and logical consequences, as
contrast to punishment and reward. (Dreikurs, Popkin)

Objectives:

  1. To learn differences between natural and logical consequences, juxtaposed with punishment and reward systems and to learn benefits of natural and logical consequences.
  2. To learn basic theory behind consequences

Audience: parents; teachers; college students

Time Required:
10-12 minutes

Method:

  1. Define natural consequences by demonstration. Set up a chair in the aisle, and trip over it: natural.
  2. Ask audience for their input and any examples they may have
  3. Define logical consequences by showing Active Parenting DVD – Video 3 – number 4. “Many times, not all students have had much experience with this, other than how they were raised. Using a video or some sort of visual to demonstrate can be effective.”
  4. Discuss punishment and reward systems. Discussion is critical for students to personalize information and relate to their own experiences. Talk about getting candy as a reward and the behavioral response that would encourage (i.e. child is only good to get candy rather than intrinsic goal).
  5. Check for understanding: read Wisdom, pg. 123 – what is it?
  6. Discuss the theory behind it: Dreikurs – social learning; importance of a democratic rather than autocratic style of parenting.


Materials Needed: Wisdom for Parents book; Active Parenting Now video, or similar material.

Outcome: Audience will be aware of the differences between various types of consequences and the theory behind natural & logical consequences.


***  ***  ***



Lesson Plans based on Keim, R.E., & Jacobson, A. L. (2011). Wisdom for Parents: Key Ideas from Parent Educators. Whitby, ON, Canada: de Sitter Publications.
Presented by Debbie Farr at TCFR Conference, March 2012


Parenting Using “WHILE ACTIVITIES”
Jerica Berge – Page 83f, Wisdom for Parents

Topic/Concept: “While activities provide the opportunity to model and enact behaviors that facilitate interpersonal relationship skills and also have a values/moral position either inherently attached to them or easily created in the process of engaging in them.”

Objectives:

  1. To define while activities and give examples
  2. Discuss how while activities can be set up or planned for
  3. Discuss benefits and outcomes of such activities

Audience: parents, education students

Time Required: 10-12 minutes

Method:

  1. Read pg. 8, 2nd paragraph. Open up discussion by presenting my while activity of tucking in each child every night and/or driving in the car.
  2. Ask audience for their input
  3. If using this in a parenting workshop, each parent can be asked to write down two while activities in their upcoming week that could be impetus for discussion
  4. Discuss that a major benefit is open communication and creating a sense of trust and attachment. Resist the temptation to make ultimatums & directives – the while activities will become even worse than the chore may have initially been!
  5. Must be done age-appropriately. “So what do you think about Jimmy’s parents divorcing?” would not be appropriate for a 5 year old!
  6. Connects to various family theories such as attachment, communication, encouragement, character development, etc.


Materials Needed: Wisdom for Parents book

Outcome: audience will be aware of while activities and use with parenting workshops or with their own children. Awareness may lead to more usage.



***  ***  ***



Lesson Plans based on Keim, R.E., & Jacobson, A. L. (2011).
Wisdom for Parents: Key Ideas from Parent Educators. Whitby, ON, Canada: de Sitter Publications. Developed for 2012 TCFR Conference byArminta Jacobson (arminta.jacobson@unt.edu)


FAMILY LIFE EDUCATION LESSON PLAN

Topic: Managing Children’s Allowances (pertaining to article on pp. 22ff)

Framework for Life Span Family Life Education: Family Resource Management

Audience: University or secondary students or community class.

Learner Outcomes: After completing this session, participants will be able to:

  1. Describe 5 allowance plans and possible effects on children and youth.
  2. Decide on a goal for a child’s allowance and choose one allowance plan based on the goal and parents’ values.
  3. Explain why an allowance plan was chosen.

Resource:
Bredehoft, D. J. (2011). Giving Allowances (2011). In R. E. Keim & A. L. Jacobson, A. L. (Eds.). Wisdom for Parents: Key Ideas from Parent Educators (pp. 22-24). Whitby, ON, Canada: de Sitter Publications.

Introductions: “How many of you receive(ed) an allowance?” (Ask for show of hands.)
“Do you know why your parents chose to give you an allowance?” (Ask for a few volunteers to share.) Today’s lesson will help you understand more about allowances and how to choose one to it your values and goals for parenting.

Overview:

Introduction of lesson: Ask “what was your reaction to reading the chapter, Bredehoft, D. J., Giving Allowances?

Establishment of set: Hold up dollar bills.
Tell about Anders, age 14, and his spending needs. Should his parents give him an allowance or just hand him money when he needs it?


Facilitated Learning Activities:

I. Question and Answer Review:

Types of allowances and possible effects on children/youth.
Name each allowance plan and ask participants to respond with possible consequences to child/youth.

  1. Free ride plan
  2. Budget plan
  3. Allowance with required responsibilities plan
  4. Free ride with incentives plan
  5. “You’ve got to be kidding me” plan

Conclusion: Each plan is based on what parents value (e.g., time). If parents are planful and intentional, allowance plan are also based on their goals for their children.


II. Application Activity

Decision making: Students pair up and pretend to be parents, choosing ages of children.

  1. Talk about values they would like to instill in their children/youth through an allowance plan, e.g. sharing with less fortunate.
  2. Decide on goals they have for their children/youth’s allowance plan.
  3. Choose the plan that fits values and goals the best.
  4. Rehearse explaining to their children/youth why they made the decision.

Check for understanding:

Role Play: With the group watching, volunteer pairs role play telling their children about their allowance plan and why they decided on it. Group members are asked to give feedback, e.g., Ask – “Will the children understand their parents’ values and goals?” (or other questions)

Closure: To quote Bredehoft, “Marketers are coming after your children’s dollars whether you have prepared them or not!” “High stakes are on the line.”
High stakes are on the line for children’s development and learning and parentchild relations as well.

Plan for Evaluation and Follow up:
Find resources on the internet for teaching children money management. Bring to the next session and be prepared to talk about how parents can use them.


***  ***  ***


Lesson Plans based on Keim, R.E., & Jacobson, A. L. (2011). Wisdom for Parents: Key Ideas from Parent Educators. Whitby, ON, Canada: de Sitter Publications.
Developed for 2012 TCFR Conference by Arminta Jacobson (arminta.jacobson@unt.edu)

FAMILY LIFE EDUCATION LESSON PLAN

Framework for Life Span Family Life Education: Interpersonal Relationships

Topic:
Nurturing Family Traditions (article on pp. 36ff in Wisdom for Parents)

Audience:
University or secondary students or community class.

Learner Outcomes:
After completing this session, participants will be able to:

  1. Describe four ways family rituals and traditions are important to us.
  2. Give examples for each of the four ways family rituals and traditions are important to us.
  3. Plan a family tradition for a new family and explain how it can nurture.

Resource:
Jacobson, A. L., Nurturing Traditions: Nurturing Families (2011). In R. E. Keim & A. L. Jacobson, A. L. (Eds.). Wisdom for Parents: Key Ideas from Parent Educators (pp. 36f). Whitby, ON, Canada: de Sitter Publications. Handout on how to conduct a family meeting on this topic:

Overview:

Introduction of lesson: All of families have rituals and traditions. They may have been passed down from generation to generation or you may have an “Intentional Family” (Doherty, 1997) and designed new ones. Today we will learn how interpersonal relations and families are enriched with rituals and traditions.

Establishment of set: Read Trey’s Xmas homecoming story p. 36, of Nurturing Traditions: Nurturing Families. You may have similar stories. In this class we will learn why Christmas traditions at our house were so important to Trey.


Facilitated Learning Activities:


I. Why are family rituals and traditions important?
In your reading for today you learned how they nurture families. (Doherty, 1997).
In today’s lesson you will be applying what you learned about:

a. Predictability
b. Connection
c. Identity
d. Enacting values


II. Application Activity: Planning a family tradition.


Scenario: Dave and Deb were married on June 4. They are looking forward to their one month anniversary on July 4, Independence Day, with his daughter(s) and her son(s). They want to celebrate their new family and establish a new family tradition for the 4th of July.

In groups of 4-6 simulate a family meeting with Dave and Deb as co-leaders.

Check for understanding:

Closure: Now help me figure out why Christmas traditions might have been so important to Trey, a college freshman returning home for his first Christmas. (e.g., predictability, connection, identity, new values). What do you think? To quote from “Wisdoms”: “As you celebrate holidays, family celebrations and religious traditions, look beyond the work of getting ready and reflect on how traditions and rituals express who you are, what you believe, and how we care about others in our families and communities.” (p. 38)

Plan for Evaluation and Follow up: Interview a parent or grandparent and ask them what their three favorite family rituals and/or traditions were in their families when they were growing up. Ask them why they liked them. Write down what you learned and classify as establishing predictability, connection, identity, and/or enacting new values. Bring what you wrote to the next class and be prepared to share.